Know Your Risk is a simple questionnaire to help you assess your personal risk of developing breast or ovarian cancer.
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1 in 8 Australian women will develop breast cancer at some point in her life.

1 in 81 will develop ovarian cancer.

Do you know your risk for developing these cancers?

Know your risk. Change your future.

Know Your Risk is developed by Pink Hope in partnership with Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre.
Learn more about the Know Your Risk tool

Know Your Risk is a simple questionnaire to help you assess your personal risk for developing breast or ovarian cancer. Based on your level of risk, the tool offers recommendations for next steps, as well as helpful information and resources. Our aim is to empower all women with a better understanding of their risk of breast and ovarian cancer, and equip them with information and resources to help manage that risk. Please allow about 5 minutes to complete this questionnaire.

Please note, Know Your Risk is designed for use by women who have not had a diagnosis of invasive breast or epithelial ovarian cancer. The tool cannot accurately assess future risk in women who have had a diagnosis of either cancer, or who have already undergone risk-reducing surgery for either cancer. If you have a previous or current diagnosis of breast or ovarian cancer, we offer some information and resources for you here. We hope you will find these helpful. We also encourage you to speak with your cancer care team, as they know your individual situation and are best placed to offer advice.

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Please, read and agree with the Terms & Conditions

The information provided in Know Your Risk is intended for educational purposes only. It is not intended to provide a diagnosis or medical advice, nor to replace the medical expertise of a health professional.

The Know Your Risk tool includes questions about the strongest risk factors for breast and ovarian cancer, as shown in scientific studies. It uses the scientific evidence on these risk factors, and the answers you provide, to estimate your risk of developing breast or ovarian cancer. However, your health and your risk of developing any disease, including cancer, is affected by many other factors. So Know Your Risk cannot guarantee your risk levels or predict if you will develop breast or ovarian cancer, only help estimate your risk.

We would like you to think of Know Your Risk as a helpful first step in assessing and managing your risk of breast and ovarian cancer. We encourage you use Know Your Risk and the array of information and resources it offers, alongside the medical expertise of your health professionals.

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Question 01

How young are you?

Age is a strong risk factor for breast and ovarian cancer, with risk of both cancers increasing with age.


Question 02

Please enter your height and weight

Height
Weight

Being overweight is associated with a higher risk of breast and ovarian cancer.


Question 03

Have you had any children?

Having children, particularly at a younger age, is associated with a lower risk of both breast and ovarian cancer.


Question 04

Did you breastfeed your children for a total of 12 months or more?

Breastfeeding reduces risk of both breast and ovarian cancer.


Question 05

In the last 10 years, have you taken oral contraceptive (birth control) pills or hormone replacement therapy for a total of 5 years or more?

Oral contraceptives appear to slightly increase the risk of breast cancer but notably reduce the risk of ovarian cancer. Hormone replacement therapy, especially longer-term use, is linked with a higher risk of breast and ovarian cancer.


Question 06

Have you been told by a health professional that you have 'dense breast tissue' based on a mammogram?

Having dense breast tissue appears to increase the risk of breast cancer. But scientists are not yet sure why exactly this is so. Breast density cannot be measured by a physical examination – only via a mammogram.


Question 07

Have you ever been diagnosed with any of the following conditions?

Please tick all that apply to you.

A previous breast condition such as DCIS or LCIS may increase a woman's risk of future invasive breast cancer. Similarly, endometriosis can increase the risk of certain types of ovarian cancer.


Question 08

Have you received radiation treatment to the chest for any cancer between the age of 10 and 30 years?

Receiving radiation therapy to the chest for the treatment of a cancer, particularly during childhood, adolescence or young adulthood, can significantly increase a woman's risk of breast cancer.


Question 09

Select the most accurate answers for your current lifestyle.

Smoking Status
Alcohol Consumption
Exercise

Not smoking, limiting alcohol consumption and doing regular exercise can all help lower risk of breast and ovarian cancer.


Question 010

Have you or any of your blood relatives been confirmed (through genetic testing) to have a high-risk mutation in a breast or ovarian cancer gene?

Mutations (faults) in certain genes – such as the BRCA1 or BRCA2 gene – can significantly increase a woman's risk of breast or ovarian cancer. Gene mutations can only be detected using genetic testing.


Question 011

Do you have Ashkenazi Jewish ancestry?

Ashkenazi refers to Jewish people who have ancestors from Eastern or Central Europe, such as Germany, Poland, Hungary, Lithuania, Ukraine or Russia. Gene mutations associated with an increased risk of breast and ovarian cancer have been found to be more common amongst Ashkenazi Jews.


Question 012

Have any of your immediate family members had breast and/or ovarian cancer?

Breast and Ovarian Cancer Breast Cancer (only) Ovarian Cancer (only)
Mother
Father
Sister
Brothers
Daughters
Sons

Immediate family members include your parents, siblings and children. Having multiple members in your immediate family with breast or ovarian cancer may increase your risk of these cancers. Pink Hope offers information and resources to help you map your family history of breast and ovarian cancer.


Question 013

Think about your immediate family members with breast cancer. Were any of them:

a) Diagnosed at age less than 40 years?
b) Diagnosed at age 40–50 years?
c) Diagnosed with bilateral breast cancer (cancer in both breasts)?

Certain details about your family members' cancer can provide more information about your risk of these cancers. Factors associated with an increased risk include: diagnosis of cancer at a younger age, having cancer in both breasts, or having both breast and ovarian cancer.


Question 014

Have any of your second-degree relatives from your FATHER’S SIDE had breast and/or ovarian cancer?

a) Breast and ovarian cancer?
b) Breast cancer (only)?
c) Ovarian cancer (only)?

Think about second-degree relatives from your father's side, including grandparents, half siblings, aunties and uncles. Include your nephews and nieces. Having multiple second-degree relatives on ONE side of the family with breast or ovarian cancer increases your risk of these cancers. Pink Hope offers information and resources to help you map your family history of breast and ovarian cancer.


Question 015

Think about second-degree relatives from your FATHER’S SIDE with breast cancer. Were any of them:

a) Male?

b) Diagnosed at age less than 40 years?

c) Diagnosed at age 40–50 years?

d) Diagnosed with bilateral breast cancer (cancer in both breasts)?

Certain details about your family members' cancer can provide more information about your risk of these cancers. Factors associated with an increased risk include: diagnosis of cancer at a younger age, having cancer in both breasts, or having both breast and ovarian cancer.


Question 016

Have any of your second-degree relatives from your MOTHER’S SIDE had breast and/or ovarian cancer?

a) Breast and ovarian cancer
b) Breast cancer (only)
c) Ovarian cancer (only)

Think about second-degree relatives from your mother's side, including grandparents, half siblings, aunties and uncles. Include your nephews and nieces. Having multiple second-degree relatives on ONE side of the family with breast or ovarian cancer increases your risk of these cancers. Pink Hope offers information and resources to help you map your family history of breast and ovarian cancer.


Question 017

Think about second-degree relatives from your MOTHER’S SIDE with breast cancer. Were any of them:

a) Male?

b) Diagnosed at age less than 40 years?

c) Diagnosed at age 40–50 years?

d) Diagnosed with bilateral breast cancer (cancer in both breasts)?

Certain details about your family members' cancer can provide more information about your risk of these cancers. Factors associated with an increased risk include: diagnosis of cancer at a younger age, having cancer in both breasts, or having both breast and ovarian cancer.


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